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All you need to know about pet seizures

seizures inn pets

Epilepsy is a rising anxiety with pet owners and is becoming a very frequent crisis in veterinary medicine. Epilepsy, occasionally called a seizure disorder, is an abrupt, spontaneous change in activities, muscle control, perception, and/or sensation. A seizure regularly occurs due to an abnormal electrical discharge in the brain.

For a pet experiencing epilepsy, it can be a terrifying event for the pet and his/her owner. Pet epilepsy can be due to various health problems, some milder than others. If your pet has such a disorder, you should always consult a veterinarian to find out the primary cause or situation and make an arrangement for upcoming action in view of your pet’s health.

Let us know the causes, symptoms, diagnosis and precautions.

Causes

  • Genetic factors
  • Low blood sugar
  • Liver disease
  • Brain tumors
  • Heat stroke
  • Poisons
  • Skull injury
  • Congenital malformations
  • Brutal worm infestations
  • Renal kidney failure
  • Vaccination
  • Head trauma
  • Vitamin deficiencies
  • Infections, cysts and cancer
  • Idiopathic epilepsy

Symptoms

  • Legs become stiff
  • Not generally sneezing
  • Paddling
  • Loose their bow
  • They may loose their urine
  • Rolling
  • Lot of choking on the grass that they have eaten
  • Loose conscious
  • Salivate a lot
  • Rapid aggressive shaking
  • Staring, distorted vision

Diagnosis

Firstly you need to decide the kind of seizures that your pet is suffering before treating the disorder. By treating the cause of the underlying disease, the seizures are actually treated. There are a variety of epilepsy disorders. A vet can help you to determine the type of the disorder.

Very often the vet will treat other conditions that cause the seizures before he/she is really able to treat the seizures.

In case, your dog is facing secondary epilepsy disorders, it is regarded as an unusual development in the brain. In case the suffering is due to seizures that are reactive, it is regarded as a metabolic malfunction, hyperthyroidism, low calcium, liver failure, toxins, kidney failure or an electrolyte imbalance. The age of the pet and the pet’s breed is also considered in diagnosis. Your pet may be subjected to a series of tests like:

  • MRI or CT brain scan to rule out brain tumors
  • Spinal tap to look for contagious diseases such as distemper.
  • Toxin tests to determine, if there are any toxins.

Frequently asked questions

1. Which are the pets that get epilepsy?

Ans. Any variety of cat or dog can build up epilepsy. Many breeds like Irish setters, Beagles, Dachshunds, Cocker Spaniels, German Shepherds and Huskies appear to have the problem.

In cats, the idiopathic form is commonly observed in Persians and Siamese.

2. When in their life do the pets show epilepsy?

Ans. Many of the pets experience their first seizures between one and five years of age. In a total seizure, the pet falls on its side with its legs stretched out and it is back domed. Partial seizures show more erratic signs. Generally, pets uphold their legs severely extended but some row as if they were running.

3. When does a pet need medication to manage seizures?

Ans. Every one or two months for a seizure more than one. The period and the sternness of each seizure need to be evaluated.

4. What are the medications to control common seizures?

Ans. Phenobarbital is a common medication for seizure. Diazepam acts as a quick relief. In the initial stage of administering phenobarbital, the pet may appear drowsy which goes away with time.

5. When in their life do the pets show epilepsy?

Ans. Many of the pets experience their first seizures between one and five years of age. In a total seizure, the pet falls on its side with its legs stretched out and it is back domed. Partial seizures show more erratic signs. Generally, pets uphold their legs severely extended but some row as if they were running.

Precautions

Certain precautions are to be taken during and after the seizure. Vets consider that the dog is not in pain, so the greatest thing for you to do is calm down and make certain that the dog does not injure himself. Do not try to control your dog, let him grab. Keep your hands away from the dog’s mouth to avoid the dog hurting you by clenching down on its jaws. Keep other pets away. Talk softly to your dog, particularly when the dog is insensible.

Some dogs behave normally after a seizure, but other dogs may be a bit unsettled. When your dog attains full perception, he may want to walk around. Help him with this issue. Provide him with sufficient amount of food and water, as some dogs feel hungry after a seizure.

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